Time-Saving Tips for School Mornings

Time-Saving Tips for School Mornings

August 20, 2021
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Parents of most school age children are very likely intimately familiar with the often-hectic morning routines that make launching a rocket into space look easy compared to getting everyone out the door, on time, with everything they need for the day.  And, the longer the morning routine, the greater the likelihood of running late and forgetting items at home. To help combat this dilemma, I'm sharing some tips for getting everyone, including me and my family, up and out of the house on time, hopefully with fewer headaches for all involved. 

Buy only plain white socks. Finding a matching pair of socks each morning can significantly delay departure. If every sock in the bin is white, there is no such thing as mismatched socks.

Prepare the launch pad the night before. Have a designated departure zone in your house. At bedtime, call a launch pad check where everyone looks to make sure their shoes, backpacks, and projects are ready for liftoff the next morning. 

Hide technology. Nothing derails a morning routine like an iPad, Xbox, Nintendo, or iPhone. Hide the technology every night, so no one is tempted in the morning. 

Buy alarm clocks.  Have THEM set their recurring alarm for 10-20 minutes before they need to get moving. That way, you don’t have to be the bad guy every single morning (although you’ll likely still have to nudge from time to time).

Start each day with 15-second hugs. Not only does it start the morning off with love and affection, but scientists say hugs make kids smarter, healthier, more emotionally stable and resilient. Can you think of a better time to do this than right before sending them to school? 

Play upbeat music loudly. Not only is music fun and helps pep everyone up, doctors say music improves brain functionality, lowers stress levels, boosts immunity, and helps with creativity. Again, is there a better time in the day for all of this? 

Decide on breakfast as a family. Set a designated breakfast for each day of the week, so it’s predetermined, and you’re not stuck making six different things every morning. Monday can be frozen waffles; Tuesday can be their choice of cereal, and so on.

I hope this list will lead to better mornings and more productive days for you and your family. Wishing you good luck guiding your kids as they develop efficient and consistent morning routines! I'd love to hear how these tips work out for you.